Robin Shulman’s favorite books about food and the Big Apple

Posted on: Tuesday, October 16th, 2012
Comments: 0

In her book, “Eat the City,” Robin Shulman explores the trend towards urban agriculture in New York City, introducing readers to a host of DIY’ers who plant, cultivate, refine, brew, pickle, ferment, fish, butcher and harvest their own food and drink. As Shulman explains, what some are calling a hipster trend is not new. Using historical records, Shulman details how the citizens of New York have kept bees, raised chickens and planted gardens since the city’s founding, undeterred by the city’s dwindling farmland, the industrial revolution, pollution and concrete.

In this episode of Stacked Up, the author reveals some of the books that inspired and informed her book. She gives high marks to the whopper,  Gotham: A History of New York City to 1898   by Edwin. G. Burrows and Mike Wallace. Although the book is more than 1,300 pages long, it fails the doorstop test because, according to Shulman, it’s “almost never boring.”

Another recommendation from our visit with Shulman is the memoir,  Day of Honey, written by Shulman’s friend and fellow Middle East correspondent Annia Ciezadlo. While covering their war-torn beat, the two reporters found themselves wanting to write about food. Their desire was, as Shulman put it, “to write about the small human ways that people sustain themselves and not the way that people destroy themselves.”

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Foraging for books with Robin Shulman

Foraging for books with Robin Shulman

Guest Author: Robin Shulman Her book: Eat the City published by Crown Books. BIO Robin Shulman grew up in a farming town in the heart of tobacco country in Ontario, Canada, and several moves later, arrived in New York City at age 16. So she has a bit of farm and a lot of city […]

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